AROUND 1.5 million people speak Scots, which is the collective name for dialects ranging from Glaswegian to Doric and Buchan to Dundonian.

The figure was gathered from the 2011 Census, which for the first time asked those living in Scotland if they can understand, speak, read and write Scots. Scholars have long argued over whether Scots is a language or just a dialect of English. However, officially it is recognised as one of three languages native to Scotland, along with English and Gaelic.

In 2011, some MSPs chose to take their oath in Scots as well as English as they were sworn into the Scottish Parliament. In English, the oath states: "I (name), do swear that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth, Her Heirs and Successors, according to Law. So help me God. I (name), do solemnly, sincerely and truly declare and affirm that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth, Her Heirs and Successors, according to Law."

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The Scots version reads: "I, (name), depone aat I wull be leal and bear aefauld alleagance tae her majesty Queen Elizabeth her airs an ony fa come aifter her anent the laa. Sae help me God. I, (name), dee solemly, aefauldly an truly declare and depone at I will be leal and bear aefauld alleadgance tae her maijesty Queen Elizabeth her airs an ony fa come aifter her anent the law."

Other examples of Scots include:

DORIC (north-east):

Cappie: ice-cream cone

ORKNEY:

Whit dis thoo mak o that? - What do you make of that?

CENTRAL SCOTS:

Gaunae no dae it - do not do it

SOUTHERN SCOTS:

Barry - good