GOVERNMENT ministers have signalled they are prepared to compromise on a key part of the Brexit Bill in order to win support from the Scottish and Welsh parliaments.

The current Withdrawal Bill would see EU powers relating to devolved areas return to Westminster rather than Holyrood or Cardiff.

But the Scottish Government has warned such a “power grab” would lead to Holyrood refusing to give support to the bill.

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Junior Brexit Minister Robin Walker said it was “quite possible” the clause would be "substantially reduced through agreement between the governments" but it is needed to provide certainty that common frameworks would be in place.

His comment comes after Scottish Tory constitution spokesman Adam Tomkins insisted the legislation must “respect” devolution and be amended to satisfy the Scottish and Welsh Governments.

He called for “movement on both sides to find a solution”.

Scottish Secretary David Mundell said government officials are currently examining the need for common UK-wide frameworks for devolved powers returning from the EU in justice, agriculture and public health.

The UK Government claims the repeal bill, which will transpose EU law into British law, will give more powers to the devolved administrations but common frameworks will be needed in some areas.

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Mr Mundell told Holyrood's Finance and Constitution Committee he believes there is a "way through" the stalemate.

He said he is "confident" of getting consent, adding: "I believe it will be possible to find a way through in relation to the EU Withdrawal Bill."

Questioned if this would happen before the end of the year when the committee is due to submit a recommendation to the Scottish Parliament, Mr Mundell said he "couldn't give that undertaking" but was hopeful of "significant progress".

He said in the next few days government officials would carry out in-depth analysis on the need for frameworks in justice, agriculture and public health.

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Mr Mundell said it is anticipated there would be "very few issues" with frameworks around justice, but insisted agriculture includes a "large number of areas where there might have a UK-wide application".

He added: "Officials from all three governments at this moment are looking in detail at the implications of frameworks, non-frameworks, the structure of taking these issues forward with a hope that they will be able to come back to the Joint Minister Committee on European Negotiations to report how that process has gone and how we can take that forward in the context of the other areas."