THIS column is dedicated to walking and ramblers' groups from across Scotland, where they can suggest the best routes to enjoy. See the panel at the end of this story if you want to get involved.

Loch Thom and Gryffe Reservoirs, Inverclyde

By Peter McElwee, Inverclyde Ramblers

Start: Greenock Cut Visitor Centre.

Distance: 10.5 miles.

Time: 4.5 hours, including stops.

Terrain: Well-formed paths, forest trails and road. One short moorland section and a scramble to the top of Corlic Hill. Walking boots are recommended. Poles are not required.

Level: Intermediate.

Access: The visitor centre can be accessed by car from the A78 at Spango Valley or the Old Largs Road at Upper Greenock. The nearest railway station is Drumfrochar.

Useful navigation reference points: the towering Hillside Hill stands directly above the visitor centre and the eight wind turbines at Corlic Hill is the mid-point of the walk. Both can be seen along most of the walk.

What makes it special: Lochside views, rich history and a decent stretch of the legs.

THIS splendid walk takes you along the shoreline of Loch Thom and onwards to the Gryffe Reservoirs. A moorland path leads up to Corlic Hill. Return is via the Old Largs Road and Loch Thom trail. Stunning views are guaranteed from start to finish on a clear day.

HeraldScotland: The scenic walking route around Loch Thom and Gryffe Reservoirs in Inverclyde. Picture: Peter McElwee/Inverclyde RamblersThe scenic walking route around Loch Thom and Gryffe Reservoirs in Inverclyde. Picture: Peter McElwee/Inverclyde Ramblers

Route: From the Greenock Cut Visitor Centre, head east along the tarmac road past the Ardgowan Fishery's cafe. The well-stocked Compensation Reservoir is on the right. Stay on the road and head uphill past the tastefully maintained memorial to the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.

At this point the road becomes a rough trail. Loch Thom emerges on your right. This vast reservoir has provided water since 1827 and was once a source of supply for the waterwheels which powered the mills and refineries of Greenock in the 19th century.

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Continue uphill on the stony path and after 400 yards turn right at the Old Largs Road signpost. This well-formed path heads east for 1.4 miles. You will reach the T-junction of the Old Largs Road. Turn right in the direction of the Gryffe Reservoirs, which is signposted.

After 800 yards, the Gryffe Reservoirs appear on your left. At the signpost, turn left along the forest trail. After half a mile take the left-hand fork, staying parallel to the reservoir. After a further half a mile you'll see the wall of the reservoir on your left.

HeraldScotland: The scenic walking route around Loch Thom and Gryffe Reservoirs in Inverclyde. Picture: John McIndoe/Inverclyde RamblersThe scenic walking route around Loch Thom and Gryffe Reservoirs in Inverclyde. Picture: John McIndoe/Inverclyde Ramblers

Walk along the wall, Gryffe No 1 is on your left and Gryffe No 2 is on your right. At this point you'll have open views towards Kilmacolm and beyond. Corlic Hill is directly in front of you, surrounded by eight towering wind turbines.

Like them or loathe them, they are a remarkable feat of engineering. At the end of the dam wall, turn right. You will cross a raised stile and then proceed along the trail for around 400 yards. At this point turn left and cross the ditch at the two orange-coloured drainpipes.

Go through the farm gate and head uphill. You'll pass through a few sheep pens and then onwards through the ruins of an old farmhouse. You should then pass through another farm gate and head uphill towards the left-hand side of Corlic Hill.

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The trail is less well defined at this point but still easy to negotiate as the hill is directly in front of you. You'll soon pick up a farm road and then turn right. After a short distance, head up the scramble towards the summit of Corlic Hill.

Enjoy the 360-degree views towards the River Clyde and Renfrewshire. The Arrochar Alps are clearly visible as is Goatfell on a clear day. The twin mobile phone masts at Scroggy Bank provide a good general reference point for the return to the visitor centre.

HeraldScotland: The scenic walking route around Loch Thom and Gryffe Reservoirs in Inverclyde. Picture: John McIndoe/Inverclyde RamblersThe scenic walking route around Loch Thom and Gryffe Reservoirs in Inverclyde. Picture: John McIndoe/Inverclyde Ramblers

Descend in a westerly direction and head along the farm trail which becomes a road at Whitelees Cottage. After one mile, you'll see the manicured fairways of Whinhill Golf Course on your right. When you reach the Old Largs Road junction turn left.

After half a mile you'll see the trail leading back to the visitor centre. Turn right and retrace your way back to the starting point, a distance of 2.2 miles.

Don't miss: There are toilets at the start and end of the walk at the Greenock Cut Visitor Centre. Visit clydemuirshiel.co.uk. Tea, coffee and hot food awaits at the Ardgowan Fishery's cafe. Visit facebook.com/ardgowanfishery

Useful information: To view the current walks programme for Inverclyde Ramblers, visit: inverclyderamblers.org.uk/programme/

Non-members can call the walk leader to book (details listed on each walk). Everyone can try out three introductory walks prior to joining, then annual membership is £36.60 for individuals or £49 for couples.

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Families are welcome. Children under 18 can join a walk for free with their parent, grandparent or guardian.

Do you have a walk you would like to suggest? Email susan.swarbrick@theherald.co.uk