A "violin without sides" is among the collection of conserved instruments at St Cecilia's Hall and Music Museum in Edinburgh's Old Town and is thought to have been used to keep the noise down.

Edinburgh University's Cecilia's Hall is Scotland's oldest purpose-built concert hall and was originally completed by the Edinburgh Musical Society in 1762.

Read more: Edinburgh's priceless store of musical history

The hall is also the university’s first visitor attraction, reopening after a £6.5m revamp, and it is claimed to be the only place on the world that you can hear 18th century music being played on instruments of the day in a contemporary setting.

HeraldScotland:

Image: Gordon Terris

More than 400 instruments have been conserved as part of the redevelopment project by a dedicated conservation officer.

Read more: Edinburgh's priceless store of musical history

The museum displays the university's collection of musical instruments from across the globe, including its world-famous harpsichords, some of which are still playable.

HeraldScotland:

Jonathan Santa Maria Bouquet is the Musical Instrument Museums of Edinburgh (MIMEd) Conservator. Image: Gordon Terris.

This work continues and the building features a dedicated space for treating instruments, which is visible for those visiting to see.

Read more: Edinburgh's priceless store of musical history

Arianna Rigamonti, 25, pictured, is studying Musicology at Pavia University in Cremona and is on a two month placement.