SCOTLAND'S music scene has received a fresh blow as it emerged that T in the Park will not be making a comeback.

Geoff Ellis, the boss of Glasgow’s TRNSMT Festival, and who had run T In The Park between 1994 and 2017 has confirmed that it has run its course.

In 2017, Mr Ellis had said that T in the Park was taking a break for a year after problems with its most recent home in Perthshire.

He insisted then that TRNSMT was not a replacement for T in the Park and had insisted then that they could run side by side.

But now he has said of T in the Park: "It was an amazing festival, but it run its course.

READ MORE: T in the Park: facts and figures

He added: “It was an amazing festival, but it ran its course. Everyone loved T and we all had great fun doing it.”

The festival was the biggest annual event in Scotland until it was cancelled indefinitely in 2016.

It comes a month after organisers confirmed that the 2019 Loopallu music festival in the Highlands will be the last.

T in the Park had as been hit with problems at its Strathallan Castle site– including one festival-goer being found dead and two teenagers dying of drug-related incidents. It was also plagued by traffic chaos.

The festival moved from Balado in 2015 as a result of environmental issues.

READ MORE: The T in the Park moments we will never forget

Mr Ellis said to the BBC: “We tried our best to work with the pressures placed upon the site, by bringing in an additional team and fixing the first year traffic issues, but ultimately we’re not in control of the overall site layout.

HeraldScotland:

“The continued restrictions means that the negative impact on our fans and the limitations placed on their experience is too great.”

Mr Ellis says the focus is solely on the future of TRNSMT – which takes place this weekend with headliners Stormzy, Catfish And The Bottlemen and George Ezra.

“It’s all about TRNSMT for us now,” said Mr Ellis.

“Things move on and we keep creating. The festival scene’s really, really healthy these days and it’s great to still be amongst it.”

When the organisers announced a gap year in 2017, they said: "We tried our best to work with the pressures placed upon the site by bringing in an additional team and fixing the first year traffic issues.

"But ultimately we’re not in control of the overall site layout and the continued restrictions means that the negative impact on our fans and the limitations placed on their experience is too great."

Mr Ellis later indicated that TRSNMT and T in the Park could co-exist.

"Obviously we wouldn't want to run them on the same weekend, but there's a big overlap in appeal and the two are very separate as well," he said in 2017.

"To me TRNSMT works if you just want to go for one day, because, say, you're a big fan of Radiohead, then you can do that. But if you like the music across all three days you can do that too.

"And the beauty of a city centre festival is that if you like you can just show up at five o'clock, while other people will show up as soon as the gates open.

"It's very different to a rural camping festival. It's not trying to compete with one, it's just different."

T in the Park becomes the latest in a run of festivals that have bitten the dust.

The Wickerman, once described as Scotland's mini Glastonbury was scrapped three years ago after the 66-year-old co-founder and site landowner Jamie Gilroy died in 2014 - amidst concerns about policing costs.

Four years ago the three-day RockNess festival that attracted 30,000 to see the likes of Kasabian, Fatboy Slim, The Prodigy and Biffy Clyro was cancelled for a second time and never returned. But a new scaled-down one-day dance music festival Groove Loch Ness took place on the same site.