More than one million people have signed a petition calling on Boris Johnson not to suspend Parliament amid growing anger over the decision. 

The petition on Parliament's website amassed the number required less than three hours after Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced he planned to prorogue Parliament in order to push through his new domestic agenda.

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Any petition that secures 10,000 signatures is guaranteed a government response and 100,000 names sees the petitions committee consider it for debate by MPs.

HeraldScotland:

The petition, which was created by Mark Johnston on Parliament's website, states that Parliament should not be prorogued unless there is another extension of the Brexit deadline or the idea of leaving the European Union is scrapped altogether.

It says: "Parliament must not be prorogued or dissolved unless and until the Article 50 period has been sufficiently extended or the UK's intention to withdraw from the EU has been cancelled."

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Seven hours after Mr Johnson's announcement, the petition hit 550,000 signatures, and it reached one million shortly after 11pm.

You can view the petition here 

In March, a petition entitled “Revoke Article 50 and remain in the EU” gathered more than six million signatures, becoming the best-supported proposal in the history of the House of Commons and Government’s e-petitions website.

The now-closed petition was rejected by the Government, in a response explaining that revoking Article 50 would “undermine” democracy.

In its official response to the petition, the Department for Exiting the EU said: “Revoking Article 50, and thereby remaining in the European Union, would undermine both our democracy and the trust that millions of voters have placed in Government.

“The Government acknowledges the considerable number of people who have signed this petition. However, close to three-quarters of the electorate took part in the 2016 referendum, trusting that the result would be respected.”