The boss of easyJet has warned that requiring holidaymakers returning from low-risk countries to pay for two coronavirus tests will only reopen international travel “for people who can afford it”.

Chief executive Johan Lundgren claimed passengers should not face “more complexities and cost” for visiting “green” destinations.

His comments were supported by the consumer organisation Which, which said that the government needs to urgently look at curreing the costs of private tests.

On Monday, the Government unveiled the outline of a traffic light system for enabling overseas leisure travel to resume as part of the easing of coronavirus restrictions.

Assessments will be based on a range of factors, including the proportion of a country’s population which has been vaccinated, rates of infection, emerging new variants and the country’s access to reliable scientific data and genomic sequencing.

Travellers returning from countries rated “green” will not be required to self-isolate, although pre-departure and post-arrival tests will still be needed.

The Scottish Government which has said that where possible it will adopt a "four nations" approach has devolved responsiblity for borders, and has still to decide on whether to adopt the system.

Mr Lundgren warned: “It should not be needed to put any more complexities and cost in order to travel to and from those destinations.”

He said PCR tests are “way over and above what the cost is of an average easyJet fare”.

If travellers are forced to pay for those tests, then “you wouldn’t open up international travel for everyone, you would open up international travel for people who can afford it,” Mr Lundgren claimed.

HeraldScotland:

He went on: “I don’t think that is fair, I don’t think it’s right, and I don’t think it is necessarily established from a medical and scientific point of view that is the right thing to do.

“If they choose, however, to go down that route to have the tests in place, it should be the same type of testing, the lateral flow testing, which is much cheaper, more accessible, that is being used to open up the domestic sector as an example.”

Rory Boland, editor of Which Travel, said: "Testing will be essential for restarting travel safely, but private tests in the UK are currently too expensive and risk pricing most people out of travel.

"Other countries have found solutions to reduce the cost of private testing, so if the government is serious about making travel safe and affordable when it restarts, it must urgently look at ways to reduce these expenses."