GUILLOTINES, castration, and flogging – these are just some of the policies put forward by the latest controversial Scottish Ukip candidate to come to the fore.

Gisela Allen also has some strange views on people being vocal members of the LGBT community. She says she finds gorillas attractive – they make her “hormones go crazy”, she claims – but she doesn’t talk about it so why should gay, lesbian or bisexual people talk about their sex life.

Allen, who is standing in Glasgow for the anti-EU party, also insisted mothers with young children should not work.

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An aide to Ukip MEP David Coburn said that Allen’s views “do not reflect official party policy”. However, in an apparent endorsement of her views, he said the candidate’s “personal manifesto” should be put to the electorate

Allen, 84, who is a Glasgow Ukip candidate, spoke exclusively to the Sunday Herald setting out her views on crime, health, childcare and relationships.

She said: “The main purpose of the law is to protect the public. If I could get the guillotine, lethal injection or firing squad I would gladly have it. I would also castrate violent criminals. You castrate bulls, horses, dogs – it takes the aggression away. Moreover, these violent criminals can’t have any more children themselves. And I am all for the cat o’ nine tails. You like violence? Well let’s see how you like to be on the receiving end.”

Allen came to Scotland from Switzerland in 1961 as an exchange student where she met her Jamaican husband, who was in the RAF. They had four children and ran a bed and breakfast. Despite her age she is in favour of euthanising the elderly and the sick.

She said: “The NHS spends a fortune on prolonging the lives of, for instance, cancer sufferers. Settle the whole nonsense. Kidney transplants, heart transplants – come off it.”

When her husband died, Allen began volunteering at Glasgow Zoo and she uses an animal analogy when speaking about the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) community.

She said: “I am not anti-gay – but how can you call that a community? Sex life is everybody’s private affair. You do not come out and declare openly. Do you think I am going all over the city and saying my idea of a sexually-attractive creature is a gorilla? When I go to a zoo and I see a gorilla my hormones go absolutely crazy. I find a gorilla very attractive.”

The mother-of-four was also adamant that mothers should stay at home and look after their young children, adding that councils should withdraw nursery funding.

She said: “When you have very small children it is advisable that you look after them yourself. If a woman is a dentist or a doctor, or in any career important to the community, we should do our best to get her back to work as soon as possible, because such careers shouldn’t really be interrupted. But if somebody sits in an office at a computer, I think her place is at home until the children are bigger.”

On possible public reaction to her views, she said: “As long as we have democracy I can stand in the street and say aloud what I think. A lot of people love me. I get kissed and cuddled in the street. It takes me ages to get home.”

When asked if she thinks she’ll gain enough votes be elected as a councillor in Glasgow, the 84-year-old suggested her dress sense could count against her, adding: “I am not exactly a fashion statement. When you represent a party you have to be 100 per cent with your appearance.”

Bill Kidd, SNP MSP for Glasgow Anniesland, said Allen’s “outlandish statements” were a “manifestation of all that makes her party so very unrepresentative” of voters in Scotland.

Ukip spokesman Colin Mitchelson, executive assistant to MEP David Coburn, said: “Having been able to read Mrs Allen’s personal manifesto, the people will be able to make their democratic decision as to whether they wish to be represented by her. One of the many fine things about Ukip is that its local councillors are not whipped, it is possible that we might make an exception in this case.”