• Text size      
  • Send this article to a friend
  • Print this article

Delight and Bafta death masks for Scottish stars

SCOTLAND picked up three of the honours at this year's Baftas as James Bond film Skyfall was named outstanding British film.

SMILING: Kilted Will Anderson, left, and Ainslie Henderson, right, with their award. Left, best actor Daniel Day-Lewis. Above, Lynne Ramsay, and right, Brave.Main picture: Stuart Wilson
SMILING: Kilted Will Anderson, left, and Ainslie Henderson, right, with their award. Left, best actor Daniel Day-Lewis. Above, Lynne Ramsay, and right, Brave.Main picture: Stuart Wilson

Edinburgh student animators Will Anderson and Ainslie Henderson took the short animation gong with a graduation project, the comedy documentary The Making Of Longbird.

In front of a star-studded audience at London's glittering Royal Opera House they took to the stage to accept their award wearing kilts.

Mr Anderson, from Alcaig in Ross-shire, said: "Thank you, I'm very honoured. I'd like to say a big thank you to the Edinburgh College of Art, where this was made as a graduation film."

Mr Henderson added: "I just want to say thanks to you, Will, for this mad journey we're on, and I want to say happy birthday to my mum."

Glasgow-born director, writer and producer Lynne Ramsay, nominated last year for a best director gong for her 2011 movie We Need To Talk About Kevin, took the short film award with Swimmer, which follows a journey through the waterways and coastline of the British Isles.

Brave, set in the Highlands, took best animated film.

And Scots comedy legend Billy Connolly got the laugh of the night when presenting the outstanding British debut award to Bart Layton and producer Dimitri Doganis for The Imposter. Connolly said: "I'm awash with bliss, at the very thought of presenting an unsuspecting stranger with a death mask on a stick."

There were few surprises as Daniel Day-Lewis was named best actor for his role in Lincoln.

Accepting the award, he poked fun at his reputation for immersing himself in his characters.

"On the chance I might one day have to speak on an evening such as this I've stayed in character as myself for the last 55 years," said the star who already won a Golden Globe and other US awards for the role, and is a favourite to pick up the Oscar.

Accepting the best British film award for Skyfall, director Sam Mendes said: "We all had high expectations for this film and this is really the icing on the cake."

Backstage, Mendes said the fact that Skyfall star Daniel Craig was not nominated for an award was "the curse of Bond".

Another big winner was Ben Affleck, named best director for his work on Iran hostage crisis drama Argo, which also won best film. Emmanuelle Riva was named best actress for her performance in Amour.

Quentin Tarantino picked up the original screenplay award for his western Django Unchained and thanked his actors for doing a "bang-up job with my dialogue". The movie also produced the best supporting actor in Christoph Waltz.

Les Miserables went into the ceremony with nine nominations and won four awards.

George Clooney presented the best supporting actress award to Les Miserables star Anne Hathaway. It also won for hair and make-up, production design, and sound.

Additional Images: 
Contextual targeting label: 
Block list

Commenting & Moderation

We moderate all comments on HeraldScotland on either a pre-moderated or post-moderated basis.
If you're a relatively new user then your comments will be reviewed before publication and if we know you well and trust you then your comments will be subject to moderation only if other users or the moderators believe you've broken the rules

Moderation is undertaken full-time 9am-6pm on weekdays, and on a part-time basis outwith those hours. Please be patient if your posts are not approved instantly.

140236