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Tom Daley welcomes baton to Britain l More tickets on sale tomorrow

OLYMPIC diver Tom Daley will carry the Queen's Baton as it arrives back in the UK today following its tour of the Commonwealth.

The event marks the start of the home nations leg of the baton's journey, in the final run-up to the opening ceremony of the Glasgow 2014 Games on July 23.

Daley will carry the baton in to St Aubin's harbour, Jersey with British indoor championship shot-putter Zane Duquemin, where it will be welcomed by hundreds of young athletes.

A two-day relay starts off on the island the next day and for the following 32 days it will travel through Jersey, Guernsey, the Isle of Man, Northern Ireland, Wales and England.

It will arrive in Scotland on June 14 for a 40-day journey through 400 communities across the host nation.

The build-up to the Games will also continue with the first tickets being dispatched to sports fans from tomorrow, the same day that more tickets go on sale.

Deliveries will continue over the coming weeks, with everyone who has bought tickets expected to receive them during May.

About 2.3 million applications were made for the initial one million tickets that were released last year.

Tomorrow more than 100,000 extra tickets across all sports are to be put on general sale from 10am, on a first-come, first-served basis.

Organisers said the finalising of venue layouts and seating plans at Glasgow 2014 had allowed them to find the extra tickets.

A Glasgow 2014 spokeswoman said: "As this is the last big chance to get tickets for the Games we expect to have a very busy day on Monday, however we are confident that we can manage call and internet traffic without any interruption to service.

"However, queues are inevitable with an event this popular."

 

I WANT TO MAKE CHILDREN WINNERS OF GLASGOW 2014

EXCLUSIVE
BY TOM DALEY

Today is going to be a special moment. I'm honoured and proud to be one of the first people welcoming the Queen's Baton to Jersey and back to the British Isles after its amazing journey across the Commonwealth. From here the Baton travels the length and breadth of the United Kingdom before arriving at its final destination in July - the Opening Ceremony of the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games.
When I was in Glasgow last year I saw for myself the excitement and anticipation building in Scotland, as preparations continue to welcome thousands of athletes and visitors this summer.
I'm so excited about the Games, as I know many hundreds of other athletes are too, and we are all training hard in the hope that we can take gold this summer.
This year it's so inspiring to know that the athletes on the podium won't be the only winners.
That's because Unicef and Glasgow 2014 have joined together to Put Children First - saving and changing children's lives in Scotland and throughout the Commonwealth.
Earlier this month, I visited a primary school in East London which has gained the Unicef Rights Respecting Award - something that hundreds of schools across the UK are working towards or have already achieved.
I heard about how children and staff across the school learn about rights and responsibilities, and apply them to all aspects of daily life.
I talked to two inspiring students - Darlene and Linus - who told me how thinking about their own rights, and the rights of others, helped them sort out playground differences on a daily basis.
Understanding children's rights was helping them appreciate what was important in their own lives, as well
as seeing things from other people's points of view.
When I was at primary school I was on the school council, and was a Year Six peer mediator. I remember how important it was for us to have a voice and be listened to, as well as to stand up for what we thought was right.
Unicef stands up for children all over the world, working every single day to try to make sure every child receives an education, has enough food and water and access to healthcare, and can fulfil their potential.
Growing up, I was so lucky to have a family who supported me, enough food and water, and a good education. There are a billion children and young people in the Commonwealth, and many of them are not as lucky as I was.
Unicef wants to change this and I'm really proud to be supporting this goal to transform children's lives. Please join me, and do whatever you can. Together we can make a real difference.

HERE'S HOW YOU CAN HELP ...

Today is going to be a special moment. I'm honoured and proud to be one of the first people welcoming the Queen's Baton to Jersey and back to the British Isles after its amazing journey across the Commonwealth. From here the Baton travels the length and breadth of the United Kingdom before arriving at its final destination in July - the Opening Ceremony of the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games.
When I was in Glasgow last year I saw for myself the excitement and anticipation building in Scotland, as preparations continue to welcome thousands of athletes and visitors this summer.
I'm so excited about the Games, as I know many hundreds of other athletes are too, and we are all training hard in the hope that we can take gold this summer.
This year it's so inspiring to know that the athletes on the podium won't be the only winners.
That's because Unicef and Glasgow 2014 have joined together to Put Children First - saving and changing children's lives in Scotland and throughout the Commonwealth.
Earlier this month, I visited a primary school in East London which has gained the Unicef Rights Respecting Award - something that hundreds of schools across the UK are working towards or have already achieved.
I heard about how children and staff across the school learn about rights and responsibilities, and apply them to all aspects of daily life.
I talked to two inspiring students - Darlene and Linus - who told me how thinking about their own rights, and the rights of others, helped them sort out playground differences on a daily basis.
Understanding children's rights was helping them appreciate what was important in their own lives, as well
as seeing things from other people's points of view.
When I was at primary school I was on the school council, and was a Year Six peer mediator. I remember how important it was for us to have a voice and be listened to, as well as to stand up for what we thought was right.
Unicef stands up for children all over the world, working every single day to try to make sure every child receives an education, has enough food and water and access to healthcare, and can fulfil their potential.
Growing up, I was so lucky to have a family who supported me, enough food and water, and a good education. There are a billion children and young people in the Commonwealth, and many of them are not as lucky as I was.
Unicef wants to change this and I'm really proud to be supporting this goal to transform children's lives. Please join me, and do whatever you can. Together we can make a real difference.

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