THIS column is dedicated to walking and ramblers' groups from across Scotland, where they can suggest the best routes to enjoy from their areas and further afield.

Linn of Dee, near Braemar, Aberdeenshire

By Lawrie McMillan, Scottish Women's Walking Group

Start: Linn of Dee car park

Distance: 2 miles/3.2 kilometres

Time: Allow 1 to 1.5 hours

Terrain: Clear tracks and little rough terrain. Can be muddy after rain.

Level: Easy. Ideal for families and dog walkers.

Access: By car. Parking costs £3 (free for National Trust for Scotland members). There are seasonal toilet facilities available. From Braemar follow the Linn of Dee Road, which is clearly signposted, for approximately 15 minutes (around 6.5 miles) to the car park.

What makes it special: A tranquil and picturesque tree-lined river gorge said to have been a favourite picnicking haunt of Queen Victoria.

THIS easy, waymarked trail in the heart of the Cairngorms National Park, near Braemar, follows the River Dee and its tributary the Lui Water, both of which are accessible at several points along the way for a paddle in the slow-flowing water.

HeraldScotland: The picturesque scenery along the Linn of Dee walking route in Aberdeenshire. Picture: Lawrie McMillanThe picturesque scenery along the Linn of Dee walking route in Aberdeenshire. Picture: Lawrie McMillan

At the start of the walk – part of the longer Glen Lui Trail – you can watch the River Dee squeeze itself through the rocks of the gorge in impressive fashion before spreading out and winding its way onwards to Aberdeen.

A permanent orienteering course is also incorporated within the route. One of the joys is seeing the regeneration of the ancient pine woods and woodland wildlife.

Route: From the large car park, the trail starts are clearly marked. This walk follows the blue trail, crossing the main road, down a slightly steep slope towards the gorge.

From here, it is worth the small detour along the yellow trail to witness the river forcing itself through a slender gap in the rocks, displaying the water's sheer power, before you return to the blue trail.

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This section follows the River Dee and there's some interesting tree growth to be seen. It then climbs again to cross over the road, now following the Lui Water. Along here you will pass a dam, the remains of an old salmon ladder and a pretty waterfall.

People taking a dip or tucking into riverside picnics are a common sight. The route takes a left turn quickly, followed by another left, taking you down a clear road with views of the pine woods opening up to reveal the mountains.

HeraldScotland: The picturesque scenery along the Linn of Dee walking route in Aberdeenshire. Picture: Lawrie McMillanThe picturesque scenery along the Linn of Dee walking route in Aberdeenshire. Picture: Lawrie McMillan

You will see a sign for the car park pointing the way through the woods. There is an information board with details about the work being undertaken to preserve the native pine woods, as well as the removal of non-native plants.

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A series of wooden boardwalks eventually lead you back to the car park. While this walk is short and sweet, it can easily stretch to a few hours by the time you stop to paddle, take photographs and have a nice lunch along the way.

Don't miss: Braving the cold water for a paddle in the river, seeing if you can spot any salmon and enjoying a riverside picnic.

Useful information: Scottish Women's Walking Group meet and walk together all over Scotland. Membership is free and open to all ages and abilities. For details of how to join, visit swwg.co.uk

Do you have a walk you would like to suggest? Email susan.swarbrick@theherald.co.uk