A Glasgow artist behind a new mural inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement has spoken out before its unveiling. 

Glaswegians will soon be able to enjoy a powerful portrait of the co-founder of a local charity named the Baba Yangu Foundation within the next two weeks. 

Behind the striking artwork is Dublin-born illustrator Claudine O'Sullivan, who says she has been "proud" to attribute to the movement in Glasgow.

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HeraldScotland:

The 31-year-old used a mixture of warm and hot colours in the 3.1m by 2.4m design which she hopes will raise awareness of the Baba Yangu Foundation and also of the Black Lives Matter Movement. 

The Baba Yangu Foundation was established in 2012 to provide support and raise awareness of the various mental health issues faced within the Black community here in Glasgow.

The charity's main objective is to eradicate the stigma and isolation associated with mental illness in the community. 

After Claudine worked closely with co-founder, Agatha Kabera, the duo hope that the artwork inspires people to make room for change in their everyday lives. 

HeraldScotland:

Claudine told the Glasgow Times: “This mural is a bit different for me, I don’t normally do portraits. A lot of my personal work is actually animals and botanicals.

“The girl that I’ve drawn, Agatha, is actually somebody that I’ve become really good friends with. She runs a mental health charity in Glasgow that focuses on mental health awareness in the Black African community and another charity in Uganda that works with children as well.

“Linking up with them was important as they were close with the Black Lives Matter movement and it allowed me to learn more around the cause."

“Drawing is a very natural thing for me so I didn’t learn much in terms of the design, but I think meeting new people and broadening my inner-circle in Glasgow through the art has been extremely eye-opening and warm."

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HeraldScotland:

Agatha, who is originally from Uganda, hopes that her mural can make Glaswegians ask themselves what they are doing to support the Black Lives Matter movement. 

She said: “I’m so excited and I really hope the message that black skin is not a probable cause reaches people.

“I was so flattered that Claudine wanted to paint me for the movement. She communicated so close with us all and I feel like I have made a true friend too.

“She really does want to help with the Black Lives Matter Movement and Baba Yangu – it isn’t just about her doing the mural it is about her wanting to make long-lasting impact.

“I hope the mural will always remind people to do something if they witness somebody being treated unequally. It can be in everyday life and I hope it motivates people to do something to make a change.

“Right now I just feel like it is individuals who are doing the change. The actual work that we really need to change is education, policing, housing and health care.

“This thing needs to stop. I want to send my child to school and know there won’t ever be a culture or a religious barrier."

HeraldScotland:

Both agreed that the concept of the mural has been needed for the city following the Black Lives Matter movement. 

Claudine added: "I think Glasgow needs a mural for this cause. There is a lot of amazing street art and graffiti here and it has been important to show all cultures within this diverse city.”

All proceeds of Claudine's portrait of Agatha will be donated to the Baba Yangu Foundation.